LegaSea newsletters

Newsletter #107 – It’s National Kahawai Day

May 28, 2021 LegaSea is celebrating May 28th as National Kahawai Day, in recognition of the community coming together in the early 2000s to save ‘the people’s fish’.  The 4-year Kahawai Legal Challenge was the first time recreational fishers had taken the Minister of Fisheries to court since the Quota Management System was introduced 20 years prior. It […]

LegaSea newsletter #106 – Let your voice be heard

May 13, 2021 The Hutchwilco New Zealand Boat Show starts today and LegaSea will be there for the full 4 days. We are looking forward to talking with you face to face. There is certainly a lot to talk about, from the launch of Rescue Fish, the fight against bottom trawling and dredging, and where the heck all […]

LegaSea newsletter #105 – See you at the show

May 5, 2021 As we head into May, fishers and boaties among us are only thinking about one thing – The Hutchwilco New Zealand Boat Show. With last year’s event being cancelled for Covid, we are more than looking forward to this year’s event.  This is our chance to talk to you face to face, and there is […]

LegaSea newsletter #104 – Celebrating communities working to protect the environment

April 9, 2021 As international awareness for the plight of our ocean grows, local communities are taking action. We’ve seen a raft of communities joining forces and placing rāhui (temporary closures) around the coastline. Supporting these efforts has meant a busy start to the year for the LegaSea crew. We have also seen some topical and timely documentaries […]

LegaSea newsletter #103 – We’re stopping the dredge

March 23, 2021 The support for banning bottom contact fishing techniques is growing.  Local community initiatives such as rāhui on shellfish species by Ngāti Hei and Ngāti Paoa, and the Coromandel Restoration Programme have only heightened the conversation of the urgency to ban destructive fishing methods that are destroying our seafloor habitats.  And just today, public consultation has […]

LegaSea newsletter #103 – Must be the season of the fish

February 25, 2021 As we move towards late summer and fishing around our coastal waters reaches its zenith for the year, the state of our fisheries becomes a more heated topic. Whether around the BBQ or the boat ramps, now is a good time to reflect how our fish stocks have changed over the years. While many fish […]

LegaSea newsletter #102 – Rescue Fish in action, in the community

February 4, 2021 As people become more frustrated with the lack of government action to protect our coastal marine environments, more communities are taking action. In the last two months two iwi have enacted rāhui to protect coastal sealife and rebuild abundance. LegaSea believes these community responses reflects problems with the way that Fisheries New Zealand and the […]

LegaSea newsletter #101 – Looking forward to a better 2021

January 20, 2021 We’re into another year and I think we’re all hoping it’s going to be far less dramatic than 2020! But no guarantees. With a refreshed government committed to change and a new Oceans and Fisheries Minister, now is the time to push hard for fisheries management reform and that’s exactly what we’ll be doing. The […]

LegaSea newsletter #100 – Dredging is a Drag

December 4, 2020 In September the New Zealand Sport Fishing Council endorsed a policy encouraging recreational fishers to retire their scallop dredges. At a time when the community is increasingly concerned about the deteriorating state of our marine environment, it’s exciting to see this Council embracing progressive policy and encouraging change to their 36,000 affiliated members.

LegaSea newsletter #99 – Change is coming so why hide the truth?

November 12, 2020 Today’s good news is undermined by the fact that we know so little about our fish stocks. While a lack of information is supposed to lead to more precautionary management decisions, our reality is much different. Fisheries New Zealand continue to withhold a raft of reports, and bottom trawling in inshore waters is still killing […]